The art of making impossible, possible: Ingrid Vanderveldt at TEDxFiDiWomen

The art of making impossible, possible: Ingrid Vanderveldt at TEDxFiDiWomen


Translator: Rebecca Sosa
Reviewer: Alina Siluyanova I mean what a treat but also kind of scary
to go after Sark and then T-Bird, they were amazing,
thank you! Whoo! (Applause) Okay, so before I get
into my presentation, what I’m really curious about,
given that this is TEDx for Women: How many women out there think that women
are key to our global sustainable future? Raise your hand.
Whoo! I do too! That’s pretty much
everybody in the room! Okay. Well. Good news. For many, many years, I’ve built and sold
a number of companies, and as they’ve mentioned
I hosted a show at CNBC, and I’ve been fortunate to do
a number of different things in my life and in my career
that have been a lot of fun for me. And people have always asked, “Ingrid, how do you make
the impossible possible, how do you do this?” And I’ve never felt like
I really had a good answer because I thought,
well, you just kind of do it. And after years
of really kind of doing it, there really is an art
and a science to it — an art and a science
to making the impossible possible. Today, we’re going to talk about the art, because I dare to say,
that the science piece, which I’d love to talk about
at some point as well, without the art, it really is
almost impossible to make the impossible possible. And the reason that this is important now, is because the last company
that I built and sold last summer, it was a green energy company. And when I was doing this company,
last fall, I really stopped and said, “Universe, what is it
that I need to do next? What do you need me to hear?” And I really clearly heard, “Ingrid, everything that you’ve been doing
in your life to date has been leading up
to where you’re going to go now.” We need to create
a global sustainable future. And the only way to do this is
through a new set of eyes, and that’s the eyes of women. And what you’re called to do is
to do everything in your power to empower a billion women by 2020. So, I knew that everything
that I was doing then, from that point forward
— and that was just a year ago — my business, my policy,
my TV initiatives, everything needed to line up
towards this vision. But the other thing was, I realized that, well, that’s great,
that the things I’m involved in all moved towards that vision. But what happens if I’m not actually doing
my part to share my story, and reach out to other women, who are exactly like me
and I’m exactly like them, and help them understand the power
of possibility, the power of belief, and the power of turning the impossible
into the possible. So, I want to share with you
three things today, and the first one talks about:
The Power of Belief. When I was in the 4th grade, it was really interesting because
the principal called my parents up, and called my parents for a meeting. And they said, “Hans and Joan,”
my parents’ names, “Dr and Mrs Vandervaldt, your child,” at that time the language they used,
I was failing out of school. And they said, “Your daughter
is not only learning disabled, but we believe she’s retarded.” — is the language they used.
I was retarded. (Laughter) And my parents, thank God for my parents, didn’t believe what they said —
thank you dear God. And they said, “This cannot be.” And the principal said, “She is. And she is failing, she doesn’t listen, you know, nothing’s going right,
we can’t do anything with her, we absolutely don’t know
what to do with your daughter.” Well, thank God for my blessed parents
who said, “We do not believe you. And we believe she has possibility. And we believe that there’s something else
going on here, that if we invest
a little bit of time and effort, maybe we can figure it out, and maybe we can actually turn
this little girl around.” So, my parents found a special school, which was many, many miles away
from our home. And they somehow got me
to go over into this special school. So, the school I was in had
four classrooms [each] in one big room, and I couldn’t really hear very well. This classroom, or this school,
had one classroom per room. Okay. It was many, many miles away
from our house, and my parents went back to the principal
and the school board and said, “Hey, our daughter, we’ve gotten her over
into this school and if you look at the rules, she lives far enough away from this school
to deserve busing to get to the school.” And the principal and
the school board said, “Impossible. Not happening. She’s the only one from this area
that’s being sent over to that school. We can’t afford it.” And my parents were thinking,
well, how are they going to do it. Because my dad was working,
my mom’s taking care of all of the kids. How are we going to do it? They found a loophole
in this whatever the laws were, whatever, and they said, “No, she deserves busing.” Lo and behold, first day of 4th grade. I go out of my front door, my parents say the bus is going to be here
to pick you up. So, now I know, in the 4th grade,
I’m going off to this special school. Well now, the bus comes and picks me up. And the kids — I’ll jump forward
and then I’ll tell you the story — the kids in school were like,
“Ha ha! You were the short bus kid!” And I was like, “Actually I wasn’t, because the school had run out
of the short buses. So, what they sent was
a long yellow bus. You know, that fits like 65 people
on that thing. And I was the only one on it! (Laughter) Whoo! It was awesome! It was totally awesome.
Because the bus driver, he became my best friend. And get this, he was like — you can imagine, a 4th grader,
pretty small — he was smaller than I was. He was African-American,
and his name was Shorty. (Laughter) Shorty and I had a lot in common.
We had issues. Anyways, so, Shorty drives me
to the special school on the special bus and it was, I’ll just say,
pissing off the school that my bus is taking all this room,
and we’re blocking it. So, they decided I need to have
my special parking space. So, what happened was: I was the last to arrive at school, just get her in last,
get her off, whatever. And then they gave me
a special parking spot, so that I’d be the first one
to leave school at the end of the day. So, I had my own special parking spot.
Okay. Well, then when I was in school
and the kids were like, “Ha-ha, this is the special kid,
you’re special,” blah blah blah. Okay, so, when I was in school, they decided that I really did
have issues, and I needed more help. So, they gave me a tutor, and that tutor would take me off
to some special classes. And they would work with me and train
with me, and we’d try to figure out what was going on
with my learning disability, and all the other things
they were saying about me. And through this whole time, you know,
kids were joking with me, they were teasing me,
it actually — you know, maybe I sort of
lived in my own world, I mean, people say
that I do that sometimes. But, you know, kids would tease, and to me, I was like, “Wait a minute. Here are my parents
doing all of this stuff because they believe in my possibility. And here I am, going to a special school, on the special bus, for the special kids,
in my own special class, had my own special parking spot. I’m freaking special! I am awesome!” (Applause) Not everybody thought that,
but I certainly did! But, here’s where it all paid off. Because in the 6th grade,
they did figure out that what the issue was,
was I had hearing problems. That once they fixed
those hearing problems, I excelled. But I realized at a really young age, not only the power of great parenting and belief from a parent
— I’m not a parent myself, but really — I understood the possibility of choice, the possibility of believing
in my own possibility, and believing that I was special. That’s critical. As women as we move out
into living our fullness, living to everything that we can be, is understanding the power
of our own possibility. Casey talked about it
a little bit earlier, everybody’s been talking about it. It’s been so awesome, I actually forgot
I was supposed to speak today, I was so into it. And it’s been incredible. So, here we go with another story
I want to share with you, though. Because believing
in the power of possibility is critical to delivering
game-changing ideas that are going to change the world and help us move
towards global sustainability. Certainly help us move towards empowering
a billion women by 2020. The next story is this. When I built my first technology company,
I had just come out of business school, and I knew I wanted to be an entrepreneur. I had gotten an MBA in Entrepreneurship. All my friends were getting
corporate jobs. That was not for me,
I knew I wanted to be an entrepreneur. I was in Austin, Texas. Dell was there, the Internet was starting, and I knew that if Michael Dell, and if some of these other people,
could build billion companies, why couldn’t I do it?
I didn’t know any better. So, what happened simultaneously
to that is this: I realized that in realizing and believing
in the possibility of that, and being okay with the fact
that I didn’t really know how I was going to build
a billion-dollar company, but I could figure out
how I might get there, I started thinking about
what do I need to do. And so I decided
I need to get myself a mentor who’s done this before,
that I can work with. And the two people in Austin
were Michael Dell, and a guy named George Kozmetsky,
who built Teledyne, and he also mentored Michael Dell. So, I decided, since Dr K,
who was in his 80’s at the time, had done it himself,
had worked with Michael Dell, and he was the benefactor
of the business school I went to, that he was a good match for me. So, I went to Dr K and I said,
“Hey, I’m just out of school, I want to build a billion-dollar company.” He took me on. The reason he took me on
is because I was ballsy enough to say this is what I want to do, and I’m willing
to do whatever it takes to get there, and I don’t know how I’m going to do it, but if you’ll help me,
I will figure it out. And he took me on,
but here was the deal — like I said he was in his 80’s. And he said, “Ingrid,
I will work with you, but you have to come and pick me up
at 4 o’clock in the morning, take me to the Holiday House,
which was his favorite place, to eat greasy-spoon breakfasts. And the reason was,
is because by 6 o’clock in the morning, I would have to take him back
to his office, so he could get on one
of his many private jets, literally, and fly around the country
to go see his companies. So, that was the deal, and I took it. So, at 4 o’clock in the morning,
every month, I would go pick him up
from his assistant, Patty, take him to the Holiday House, and we would work
on the business idea that I had. At the time, the Internet was starting
to kind of grow in popularity and, you know, I saw a lot
of people getting funded, and I thought, “Gosh, I would love
to participate in that! And certainly I can build
a billion-dollar company out of this!” Well, long story short, my father ran an artificial intelligence
technology company and that’s actually
where I get my real geeky side. I love technology, AI, all that stuff. And he and his team had developed
a piece of technology that they were using for defense systems. So, what they were actually doing,
is that here in the United States — you know, those big helicopters
you see in the news all the time, like in the wars unfortunately? — well, if people, if the army thinks
something is wrong with these helicopters, they ground them to look at them. Every time they ground them,
that costs $300,000. It’s kind of like
when you take your car in, and you’re going to spend $100
to have it checked out, well, in the army it’s $300,000. So, this technology
that my father’s company had developed was an artificial-intelligence-based
technology that they would apply to the database
of the helicopter while it was running, and it could predict, with 97% accuracy, what the likely chance was of some kind
of fault happening in this helicopter. And this thing,
it was saving tons of money for our government and all that stuff,
winning lots of awards, and as I was working with Dr Kozmetsky
and I was thinking, “What can I do in the Internet?
What can I do in the Internet?” And this stuff was going on
with my father’s company, and I was like, “Wait a minute. There’s got to be a way to use
that same technology and apply it to all those 0’s and 1’s
that are flying across the Internet, and do assessments, to do personalization,
what we know today as personalization. Well, long story short,
for the next 9 months, I would meet with Dr Kozmetsky
and I’d say, “I’ve figured it out, I’ve figured out
how we’re going to do this!” And Dr K would say, “No, my dear,
you haven’t. Go back, try it again.” “Dr K, I’ve figured it out!” The end of 9 months, at that point, like my dad had put
some resources behind the technologists, making sure we could keep them on board
while I was figuring this out, and we were about to hit the wall,
the company was going to close, and I was on the flight,
going back to Austin, Texas from Tennessee, which is
where the technology was based, and I literally did
what I do all the time: as people who know me
know I’m deep in meditation. And I went into meditation and I said, “God, I need this answer.
I really need this answer. If you need me to channel
this billion-dollar company just bring it to me now,
because I need it.” Well, a lightning bolt,
like literally I’m on that flight, it was like a lightening bolt
struck my arm. Started scribbling
— Sark was talking about that — started scribbling it out on the napkin. I knew the minute I scribbled it out
that I had hit it. The plane landed, called Dr K,
I said, “I figured it out!” He brought me over
to his office right away. We started patents on it that day. That night, I get a call
from one of the guys working with me who said I’ve got an investor
who wants to hear about it. “Can you put this
in a PowerPoint presentation, show it to him in the morning?” —
“Of course.” Did that. Next morning, did
the presentation with the investor. The investor sees it, shakes my hand,
and leaves. And I said to Mike, the guy
who introduced us, “What happened? This is the most awesome idea ever! Does he not see
what the vision of this is?” Didn’t have an answer. He calls me later that day
and he said, “Ingrid, Bill is not going to invest
in the company. Bill wants to buy that napkin sketch
for $2 million dollars.” Now, looking back, I didn’t make any money
on that company, it did well for a while, but I didn’t make any money
on that company, should have taken it,
but, thank you, but, long story short, what I learned, and in that process,
I told Bill, I said, “If you want to participate,
you come in as an investor.” He came back the next day,
gave us $250,000, and that really kicked off
that first company for me, and it also earned me my first patent. What I realized in that process, though,
was the second point, which is we have to get really comfortable
with being uncomfortable. So, I’m going to jump to the third point because I’m going to run out of time
in a minute. And I practiced this, and I was like, “It’s not going to happen!”
But, of course, it happens. Okay. So, here’s the third point: because, back in August, this past August, so, as I’m meditating again,
as I do every single day, and I was like, “Universe, if I’m going
to help women understand, how do we like manifest? What’s the art of manifesting
the impossible to the possible if we take the science out of it? If we have to think that we can believe
in the possibility, and if we have to understand that we have to get comfortable
with being uncomfortable, what’s the deal?” It was like lightning struck again. And it was like the universe said,
“Ingrid, think back to the biggest deals you’ve ever done in your life. When you did that deal with Dr Kozmetsky,
how long did it take?” 9 months. How many moms are out here?
Raise your arms. I’m not a mother, like I said.
Someday I’ll adopt kids, or at least that’s the plan
if my husband will let me. [Laughter] Or if he’ll buy into it, Glen,
if you’re watching. Anyway. [Laughter] 9 months. Last year, after I sold my last company, and I was inspired with that idea
of how am I going to reach a billion women by 2020, well, I knew then that I had to team up with some of the largest organizations
out there that are actively involved with inspiring
and empowering entrepreneurs, and how would technology be part of this to help us get there better,
cheaper, faster. 9 months later, Dell hires me
as their first entrepreneur in residence. My CNBC show? —
I am not a trained television personality. I just knew that if I was going to reach
millions of people around the globe, I had to host a television show. I had no idea how I was going to do that. From the time that that idea was
born in my mind, 9 months later, actually on my birthday, that show was greenlit. One more idea, oh, my green company. From the time that the idea
was incepted in my mind, 9 months later it sold. Even my own marriage. I thought my husband and I
had been together 10 months, it was 9 months. And I was like, “Got it God!” Women of all types,
we birth babies of all kinds, but I got it. If women are the secret to empowering
a billion women by 2020, we intuitively know how to do it. If we can believe that we can conceive, if we can believe in the possibility, if we can get comfortable
with the uncomfortable of carrying these babies, and 9 months later
we can birth them into being, we can make anything happen. So, with that, I encourage you,
I need you, we need you, as the women earlier today were saying: As women, we need you to step into
what you intuitively and already know! You don’t even have to do that much work, because the natural law of birthing just that process alone, we understand how to make things happen. And that timepiece, keep it in mind, whether it’s 9 months or
some other time for you, that’s critical too. And the reason that is critical
is because if things — I believe in the law of attraction — but if things happened overnight, we’d never have to believe
in the possibility because they’d just manifest. If time didn’t matter, we’d never have to learn how to get
comfortable with the uncomfortable. So, there’s time there. And ladies, and guys too —
I’m seeing some of the guys, and we love you, we adore you,
and love working with you, oh, you’re fine — just love you. But ladies, it’s our time. Step up. Bring it. We need you. And if there’s anything
I can do to help you, you just let me know what it is, because I’m here in service to you
and in service to the world. Thank you. (Applause)

100 thoughts on “The art of making impossible, possible: Ingrid Vanderveldt at TEDxFiDiWomen”

  1. This reminds me of a joke

    |A Woman woke up and hit the alarm button , created by a man. Then she makes her breakfast in the micro oven , made by a man. Then she droves to the workplace by a car, made by a man, works on her PC, made by  a man and uses her Iphone several times, made by a man, with OS created by a man. and she texts "

    I am an independent woman, why would I need a man?"

    This sums up all feminism at core 🙂

    Seriously, women are super capable and nice creatures. We are all human, compatible and need each other. Man without a woman is incomplete and vise verse. Think otherwise is stupid and retarded
    That`s why there are so many sad , ill and unhappy business man oriented women.

  2. I'm not sure if even Picasso sold a napkin sketch for two million. That was an inspired moment and I admire her honesty and bravery for coming out of the spiritual closet. More great people have been guided than many are ready to understand. I wonder if this has anything to do with the Dalai Lama saying the western woman will save the world.

  3. I can't believe I am still watching this! minute 10:00. Should I continue, someone from the future can please let me know if there is any hope in this video? thnx

  4. Around 19 minutes of talking sharing smth that could be explained within like…5 minutes
    The message is beautiful, but she said way to little for the time she used

  5. I think that some doctors are just ignoramuses! When I was a baby, I had one of them call me retarded! So, I told them, "Bitch! I love learning! Give me that damn book!"

  6. It would have been a more effective talk if it had been less personal. "Lightning struck", "issues", "special parking space". I feel Ingrid wasted most of her time in the context and yet hasn't linked it firmly to the "point". I am glad I kept watching up to the end, and she definitely concluded the video very well. Yet, not up to par with other TED videos in my opinion.

  7. Lloyd Lee Wilson; The Power of Vision/Leadings; Cherish Visions, Dreams, Imagination; Support and Nurture Visionaries In Society To Birth New And Sustainable Ways Of Living
    http://agreenroad.blogspot.com/2015/09/the-power-of-vision-cherish-visions.html

  8. Did anyone get the third point? Approaching her 3rd point, she talked a lot about the time period of 9 months. She did say that women naturally knew how to get things done. But I couldn't figure out exactly what the third point was. #1 was the power of belief, #2 was to get really comfortable with being uncomfortable, #3 ???
    I didn't give it a thumbs up but kudos for getting on stage.

  9. There is so much advertisement and money made with these specific TEDTalks that the real point often gets lost – to help other people and to make a few of those helpers in a minute to millioniare – not that they deserve it – but they need it often to fulfill their job retirdments like everybody- PROVING to us that bradley cooper never took school serious and he made multi millions o it

  10. Shes so energetic ! I loved her confidence! wish she would talk less about her personal achivements and indtead talk more about what shes supposed to talk about! However the limited time she had wouldnt let her to give all her points.

  11. 97% accuracy of predicting failure looking at database of helicopter maintenance record? This is where I realized her father got rich off the tax-payer. Good for him.

  12. I would have watched the complete vdo but her annoying clap absolutely when its not needed made me switch off.. Speakers be natural & normal and we will listen and watch

  13. She shared something truly inspiring here. I enjoyed the video very much and do not mind about the clap or "loaded question" at all. If the stuff inside is good, I won't worry much about the wrapping paper.

  14. it was the Women who Stood up to England around 1770 they formed Groups and Traveled to the Colonies teaching other Women how to make Cloths, Soap Everything they needed, they signed a Letter and sent it to the King and We will Not Buy your Expensive Products, This put their Husbands , Brothers LIVES on the LIne, its was the Women in ICELAND that caused the Men to to go ARREST the BANKERS and Many of the Politicians in 2008-9 and take back Control of their Money System, the Women Quit Cooking for the Man and Having Sex they Marched in the Streets Banging POsts and Pans and the Men took Action, see Constitution Attorney video KRIS ANN HALL for Details,

  15. This video is pointless! First of if her daddy is rich she should not be on TED giving a sermon on the art of making it! Second in order to reach out to other humans you have to have the common struggle with them/like them otherwise no one is going to listen about your daddy's connection to a Fortune 500 company blah blah blah on…last but not least this has nothing to do with women its 2016 anyone can do anything what's up with the women stuff ..?! Assuming she had another one of her daddy's connection to come on to TED and talk….I'm glad she feels accomplished good for her! It must be hard growing up in a rich family and feeling like you have to prove yourself something! She feels she made something of herself good for her.

  16. Last October I applied for a job I thought I could never get.. This Friday I will have an interview for this job and by July I will be in training.. 9 months

  17. It was determined she was retarded because she did not fit  as an easily malleable pretzel that an insane system could mold into a common denominator of mundane dead reality !!!!

  18. There is something that hit me, and that is she meditates every day… which is wonderful.. it means she asks to the Universe to tell her how to solve whatever problem she has…

  19. Down vote here. Stopped at 8:15 and she still hasn't said anything of substance other than she started and sold a "green company". Maybe she was too young at the time but the school district certainly wasn't thinking in a green manner. Why were they using the largest bus available disrupting the parking flow at the new school. Burning excessive amounts of fossil fuel and creating much more co2 emissions when the simple solution should have been to use a district automobile to do the transporting. This is what she should have been addressing ? But up to now the talk is all about this "crazy thing" the school district did just for her ? A waste of time. Please take note of the up and down votes. I did not here. If not around 10 to 1 or better. I don't normally listen to it.

  20. french are the devil😈they create the third rajhthx to them we live free….🤕uncle bean… tell to me was upset will them so they loose the war.☠️

  21. Loved this talk! Needed now more than ever. A billion women empowered by the year 2020: Believing in the possibility of choice and what is possible, becoming comfortable with what is uncomfortable, making things happen by tuning in intuitively and being aware of the "time piece" i.e. birthing process of a notion. So many nuggets of gold here: women are the key to our global sustainable future, ask for help (mentors), communicate with a higher power, meditate, trust your intuition, re-frame negative situations into positive opportunities. Inspiring!

  22. i picked up the piece that inspires and is usefull for the stage iam at in persuing my dream it does not have to be a billion dollar company but to see someone accomplish something is inspiring and she did not get into details but gave a few hints

  23. Thanks Ingrid, I will be getting in touch with you. I listened to about 20 talks today and your message hit home for me. Thank you and I'll be in touch. God's Speed…

  24. Your problem is you alienate yourself from mankind by always saying "i am a woman" [not a human]… wake up little girl. Join with the rest of the human race, or stay lost.

  25. Donald Trump proved this theory by curb stomping Hillary, Obama, their Media Goons, and the entire DNC Machine in his first ever Campaign….

  26. Why cant women be calm be grounded and talk normally and speak to the point…it really kills the punch when it comes to communicating or bringing the point across.

  27. noone checked her hearing? amazing. when a child struggles they need to be checked for the obvious obstacles, hearing and dyslexia included. that the people in this case had all the resources and didnt is worrying…

  28. My parents believed I was backward even before school did! Mmmmm must be wonderful to have parental backing like that.

  29. Love your talk! I've been working hard on figuring out exactly what I want to do with my life and how I want to make a difference and your right it takes time and a lot of thinking we've figured it until we really do. I recently fractured my vertebrae and just had a spinal fusion 29 days ago. Well the past two years I've been trying to recover I really dived into understanding myself and what I want to do with my life and listening to incredibly people like you who are helping me in the right directions. For the first time in my life I can see the road I want to take and I want to thank you for your words and being such an inspiration for woman like me.

  30. Hello Ingrid;
    I just graduated with a BA in business administration May 2018 at " Ana G Mendez University ", and want to go with an idea to employ 4,000 people. I want to create a business with this many people to work with me, but I might be going to far and unrealistic. Help me! I'm looking for this opportunity and am visualizing how I can help San Juan Puerto Rico grow in raising a stronger economy. I live in Guaynabo Puerto Rico, in the mountains, I just feel I can do something big. I'll keep you posted.

    Dreaming big!!!

  31. She has rich parents, but she knows that to believe in success she must defend herself, she has marbles up there! She's talented period.

    Looking beyond hope!!

  32. i really enjoyed tbis speach. i realate, as a child i was also bullied for not being smart. my mother believed in me though even when other did not. bow i am grown and doing well. i ferl happy anf i feel confident. ehrn i am thinking aboyf bettering myself i am lit and risen. i know tbat i am meant for success and thank you Ingrid, and thank you Ted for providing and outlet for videos like these. As women This Is Our TIME!

  33. Why does she focus so much on women? It's not hard for women to be successful, stop trying to pretend otherwise. The days of oppression ended awhile ago.

  34. I just adore you Ingrid. I was lucky enough to meet you at an Ali Brown workshop and you have inspired me to step up, become visible, help women and I have!

  35. don't forget the value of a wet towel. it doesn't only mean that someone took a shower. its also one of the best tools to clean and rehydrate the air.

  36. Is it just me or is she just…really annoying? Not only could I not find anything usefull, she keeps talking like a narcissist. And her voice is irritating.

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