Artist Elisabeth Condon at Wave Hill

Artist Elisabeth Condon at Wave Hill


I’ve been practice Chinese idioms, the four
gentlemen specifically, which are calligraphy turned into plant forms as a way to start
looking at natural forms as gestures and having an internal life rather than just being something
out there that you draw, but something that can be felt and sensed. In the course of drawing, in the greenhouse,
I’ve met so many people here. And I guess what’s interesting about my
interactions with them and working here is that I start to learn how plants work from
the inside and that helps me draw them from the outside. You know, there’s all these systems inside
of plants just like we have circulatory systems, and this circles back to Chinese idioms because
the whole practice of Chinese painting, which comes out of calligraphy, is the correspondence
between ink and brush and paper, the correspondence between breath and air and light, and so drawing
itself becomes a sort of circulatory system. And so I think that’s the greatest gift
that I’ve had here outside of just the visual opulence of six weeks of working in the Glyndor
Gallery.

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